COVID-19

Champaign County

14 Days
Ago
Latest 14 Day
Trend
Cases 98 27 −72%
Hospitalized 29 33 +12%
Monthly Deaths* 3 3 0%
Latest data: Monday
* 303 total deaths

Charts for Champaign County are posted weekdays on Twitter @ChampaignCovid.

Hospitalized

Wastewater Surveillance

Definitions from the CDC:

  • Pct. Tests Detecting SARS-CoV-2: The proportion of tests with SARS-CoV-2 detected, meaning a cycle threshold (Ct) value <40 for RT-qPCR or at least 3 positive droplets/partitions for RT-ddPCR, by sewershed over the 15-day window defined by ‘datestart’ and ‘dateend’. The detection proportion is the percent calculated by dividing the 15-day rolling sum of SARS-CoV-2 detections by the 15-day rolling sum of the number of tests for each sewershed and multiplying by 100.
  • Percentile: This metric shows whether SARS-CoV-2 virus levels at a site are currently higher or lower than past historical levels at the same site. 0% means levels are the lowest they have been at the site; 100% means levels are the highest they have been at the site. Public health officials watch for increasing levels of the virus in wastewater over time and use this data to help make public health decisions.

Illinois

Community levels are calculated by the CDC based on new cases and hospital data. Community transmission levels are calculated by the CDC based on new cases and test positivity.

United States

World

Case Acceleration

As of Sunday, the 14-day percent change in average new cases was:

  • -72% in Champaign County
  • -13% in Illinois
  • -19% in the United States
  • -11% worldwide

This chart measures how quickly the average number of new cases is changing, or roughly, the slope of the new-cases charts above. If the case acceleration is positive, then the average number of new cases is increasing. If it is negative, then the average number of new cases is decreasing.

Death Acceleration

As of Sunday, the 14-day percent change in average new deaths was:

  • 20% in Illinois
  • 4% in the United States
  • -11% worldwide

This chart measures how quickly the average number of new deaths is changing, or roughly, the slope of the new-deaths charts above. If the death acceleration is positive, then the average number of new deaths is increasing. If it is negative, then the average number of new deaths is decreasing.

Sources

Champaign-Urbana Public Health District, University of Illinois, Illinois Department of Public Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Our World in Data and the COVID-19 Data Repository by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University.